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Prevents and Fights Cancer (References 1, 2, 3)

more Labs and 3. Labs, Labs,

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15.04.2019

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  • more Labs and 3. Labs, Labs,
  • Labrador Retriever
  • Highlights
  • Labrador Retriever - Beagle (mix) · Female, 5 years, 41 Female, 3 months, 15 lbs. ID .. Adopt a Dog. © California Labradors, Retrievers and More. This is still the role of many working Labradors today, but so popular have the breed become as companions, that far more of these lovely dogs. But add in two more genes that determine the "unrecognized" Labrador breed colors, and you've spun a web of possibilities. Can two Labs of the same color.

    more Labs and 3. Labs, Labs,

    Labrador Retrievers hail from the island of Newfoundland, off the northeastern Atlantic coast of Canada. John's dogs, after the capital city of Newfoundland, Labs served as companions and helpers to the local fishermen beginning in the s.

    The dogs spent their days working alongside their owners, retrieving fish who had escaped hooks and towing in lines, and then returned home to spend the evening with the fishermen's family. Although his heritage is unknown, many believe the St. John's dog was interbred with the Newfoundland Dog and other small local water dogs. Outsiders noticed the dog's usefulness and good disposition, and English sportsmen imported a few Labs to England to serve as retrievers for hunting.

    The second Earl of Malmesbury was one of the first, and had St. John's dogs shipped to England sometime around The third Earl of Malmesbury was the first person to refer to the dogs as Labradors. Amazingly, Labs — now America's most popular dog — were almost extinct by the s, and the Malmesbury family and other English fans are credited with saving the breed.

    In Newfoundland, the breed disappeared because of government restrictions and tax laws. Families were allowed to keep no more than one dog, and owning a female was highly taxed, so girl puppies were culled from litters. In England, however, the breed survived, and the Kennel Club recognized the Labrador Retriever as a distinct breed in The American Kennel Club followed suit in , and in the '20s and '30s, British Labs were imported to establish the breed in the U.

    The breed's popularity really began to take off after World War II, and in , the Labrador Retriever became the most popular dog registered with the American Kennel Club — and he's held that distinction ever since. He also tops the list in Canada and England. Today, Labs work in drug and explosive detection, search and rescue, therapy, assistance to the handicapped, and as retrievers for hunters.

    They also excel in all forms of dog competitions: The Lab has the reputation of being one of the most sweet-natured breeds, and it's well deserved. He's outgoing, eager to please, and friendly with both people and other animals. Aside from a winning personality, he has the intelligence and eagerness to please that make him easy to train. Training is definitely necessary because this breed has a lot of energy and exuberance. The working heritage of the Lab means he is active.

    This breed needs activity, both physical and mental, to keep him happy. There is some variation in the activity level of Labs: All thrive on activity. Labrador Retrievers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions.

    Not all Labs will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed. Hip dyplasia is a heritable condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but you may not notice any signs of discomfort in a dog with hip dysplasia.

    As the dog ages, arthritis can develop. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred. If you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems. This is a heritable condition common to large-breed dogs. It's thought to be caused by different growth rates of the three bones that make up the dog's elbow, causing joint laxity.

    This can lead to painful lameness. Your vet may recommend surgery to correct the problem or medication to control the pain. This orthopedic condition, caused by improper growth of cartilage in the joints, usually occurs in the elbows, but it has been seen in the shoulders as well. It causes a painful stiffening of the joint, to the point that the dog is unable to bend his elbow. It can be detected in dogs as early as four to nine months of age.

    Overfeeding of "growth formula" puppy foods or high-protein foods may contribute to its development. As in humans, canine cataracts are characterized by cloudy spots on the eye lens that can grow over time. They may develop at any age, and often don't impair vision, although some cases cause severe vision loss. Breeding dogs should be examined by a board-certified veterinary ophthamologist to be certified as free of hereditary eye disease before they're bred.

    Cataracts can usually be surgically removed with good results. PRA is a family of eye diseases that involves the gradual deterioration of the retina. Early in the disease, dogs become night-blind. As the disease progresses, they lose their daytime vision, as well. Many dogs adapt to limited or complete vision loss very well, as long as their surroundings remain the same. Labs can suffer from epilepsy , which causes mild or severe seizures. Seizures may be exhibited by unusual behavior, such as running frantically as if being chased, staggering, or hiding.

    Seizures are frightening to watch, but the long-term prognosis for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy is generally very good. It's important to remember that seizures can be caused by many other things than idiopathic epilepsy, such as metabolic disorders, infectious diseases that affect the brain, tumors, exposure to poisons, severe head injuries, and more.

    Therefore, if your Lab has seizures, it's important to take him to the vet right away for a checkup. TVD is a congenital heart defect that has been increasing in prevalence in the Labrador breed. Puppies are born with TVD, which is a malformation of the tricuspid valve on the right side of the heart.

    It can be mild or severe; some dogs live with no symptoms, others die. TVD is detected by ultrasound. Research is ongoing to learn how widespread it is in the breed, as well as treatment.

    Myopathy affects the muscles and nervous system. The first signs are seen early, as young as six weeks and often by seven months of age. A puppy with myopathy is tired, stiff when he walks and trots.

    He may collapse after exercise. In time, the muscles atrophy and the dog can barely stand or walk. There is no treatment, but rest and keeping the dog warm seems to reduce symptoms. Dogs with myopathy should not be bred because it is considered a heritable disease. Commonly called bloat , this is a life-threatening condition that affects large, deep-chested dogs like Labs, especially if they're fed one large meal a day, eat rapidly, or drink large amounts of water or exercise vigorously after eating.

    Bloat occurs when the stomach is distended with gas or air and then twists. The dog is unable to belch or vomit to rid himself of the excess air in his stomach, and blood flow to the heart is impeded. Blood pressure drops and the dog goes into shock. Without immediate medical attention, the dog can die. Suspect bloat if your dog has a distended abdomen, is drooling excessively, and retching without throwing up. He also may be restless, depressed, lethargic, and weak with a rapid heart rate.

    If you notice these symptoms, get your dog to the vet as soon as possible. Acute moist dermatitis is a skin condition in which the skin red and inflamed. It is caused by a bacterial infection. The more common name of this health concern is hot spots. Treatment includes clipping the hair, bathing in medicated shampoo, and antibiotics. Cold tail is a benign, though painful condition common to Labs and other retrievers. Also caused limber tail, it caused the dog's tail to go limp. The dog may bite at the tail.

    It isn't cause for alarm, and usually goes away on its own in a few days. It is thought to be a problem with the muscles between the vertebrae in the tail. The Lab's love of water, combined with his drop ear make him prone to ear infections. Weekly checking and cleaning if necessary helps prevent infection. If you're buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy's parents.

    Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. In Labs, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals OFA for hip dysplasia with a score of fair or better , elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand's disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation CERF certifying that eyes are normal.

    You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site offa. The lovable Lab needs to be around his family, and is definitely not a backyard dog. If he's left alone for too long, he'll probably tarnish his saintly reputation: A lonely, bored Lab is apt to dig , chew , or find other destructive outlets for his energy.

    Labs show some variation in their activity levels, but all of them need activity, both physical and mental. Daily minute walks, a romp at the dog park, or a game of fetch, are a few ways to help your Lab burn off energy.

    However, a puppy should not be taken for too long walks and should play for a few minutes at a time. Labrador Retrievers are considered "workaholics," and will exhaust themselves. It is up to you to end play and training sessions. Labs have such good reputations that some owners think they don't need training. That's a big mistake. Without training, a rambunctious Lab puppy will soon grow to be a very large, rowdy dog. Luckily, Labs take to training well — in fact, they often excel in obedience competitions.

    Start with puppy kindergarten , which not only teaches your pup good canine manners, but helps him learn how to be comfortable around other dogs and people.

    Look for a class that uses positive training methods that reward the dog for getting it right, rather than punishing him for getting it wrong. You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Lab puppy. Don't let your Lab puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement until he's at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility, with its one-inch jumps.

    Like all retrievers, the Lab is mouthy, and he's happiest when he has something, anything, to carry in his mouth. He's also a chewer, so be sure to keep sturdy toys available all the time — unless you want your couch chewed up. And when you leave the house, it's wise to keep your Lab in a crate or kennel so he's can't get himself into trouble chewing things he shouldn't.

    How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don't all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl.

    Keep your Lab in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you're unsure whether he's overweight, give him the eye test and the hands-on test. First, look down at him. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on his back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward.

    You should be able to feel but not see his ribs without having to press hard. If you can't, he needs less food and more exercise. These dogs grow very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders. Feed your puppy a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast. For more on feeding your Lab, see our guidelines for buying the right food , feeding your puppy , and feeding your adult dog.

    The sleek and easy-care Lab coat has two layers: The two-layer coat protects him from the cold and wet, which helps him in his role as a retriever for hunters. The coat comes in three colors: Black was the favorite color among early breeders, but over the years, yellow and chocolate Labs have become popular.

    Some breeders have recently begun selling "rare" colored Labrador Retrievers, such as polar white or fox red. These shades aren't really rare — they're a variation of the yellow Lab. Grooming doesn't get much easier than with a Lab, but the breed does shed — a lot.

    Buy a quality vacuum cleaner and brush your dog daily , especially when he's shedding, to get out the loose hair. Labs need a bath about every two months or so to keep them looking clean and smelling good. Of course, if your Lab rolls in a mud puddle or something foul, which he's apt to do, it's fine to bathe him more often. Brush your Lab's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it.

    Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath. Trim nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and prevent your legs from getting scratched when your Lab enthusiastically jumps up to greet you.

    His ears should be checked weekly for redness or a bad odor, which can indicate an infection. When you check your dog's ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Don't insert anything into the ear canal; just clean the outer ear. Because ear infections are common in Labs, also clean out the ears after bathing, swimming, or any time your dog gets wet.

    This helps prevent infection. Begin accustoming your Lab to being brushed and examined when he's a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you'll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he's an adult.

    As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Some love it more than others, and some of those are Labrador retrievers—the bottomless pits of the canine world. Dog obesity isn't something we talk about a lot, but there sure is a lot of it. Some breeds, like black labs, chocolate labs, and golden retrievers, are more obesity-prone than others. This is likely because, like many of us, they are highly motivated by food.

    But those treats add up. The domesticated dog, Canis familiaris , is a single species with a lot of variations.

    Great Danes and Chihuahuas are both dogs, but their bloodlines, and therefore their genes, are dramatically different. And all those differences within a single species make dog breeds a great resource for scientists studying genetics. Researchers recruited nearly adult Labrador participants. Of those dogs, were pets recruited through an email invitation from the UK Kennel Club, and 80 were part of an assistance-dog breeding colony.

    Some of the dogs were fat, while others were not, but all of them were healthy, with no pre-existing conditions. First, the dogs were weighed. Then the scientists collected drool samples from 33 of the dogs and sequenced the DNA within.

    As relatives, of course, the labs had a great deal of genetic material in common with each other and with other dog breeds. But they also had one gene variant that stood out: Previous studies of this POMC variant have shown a relationship with appetite and a feeling of fullness.

    Each dog could have one copy of the POMC variant, two copies, or none. The more copies a dog had, the fatter and more food-motivated it was. And about 23 percent of labs are carrying at least one copy of the variant. So further research in these obese Labradors may not only help the well-being of companion animals but also have important lessons for human health. Shrimp have developed a reputation as the appetizers of the sea. If you eat enough of them, it can constitute a meal.

    Shrimp is even more popular in America than tuna, with Americans eating an average of four pounds of the delicious little crustaceans every year. Few people, however, ask for prawn cocktail or prawn scampi.

    While prawns seem virtually identical to shrimp, they seem to have languished in popular culture. Prawns are in the decapod suborder Dendrobranchiata, with claws on three pairs of legs, large secondary pincers, and a freshwater habitat.

    Saltwater-raised shrimp, in contrast, have a more distinctive bend to their bodies thanks to the second segment of their shell overlapping the first and third segments. They also have one fewer pair of claws plus plate-like gills and large front pincers.

    Shrimp and prawns have a nearly identical taste, though some people might be able to detect a slightly sweeter flavor to prawns.

    Labrador Retriever

    3. Silver Labradors exist, but aren't recognized by breeders or kennel clubs. The official coat READ MORE: Hungry, Hungry Labs: The Genetics of Obesity. The Labrador Retriever, or just Labrador, is a type of retriever-gun dog. The Labrador is one of During the s, the 3rd Earl of Malmesbury, the 6th Duke of Buccleuch and the 12th Earl of Home collaborated . American Labs tend to be more energetic and, having been bred to compete in field trials, are better suited for. California Labradors, Retrievers & More Rescue, San Diego, California. Who is Labs and More? Murphy's Christmas Wish. #BITB 3.

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    Comments

    wintos

    3. Silver Labradors exist, but aren't recognized by breeders or kennel clubs. The official coat READ MORE: Hungry, Hungry Labs: The Genetics of Obesity.

    pukijopa

    The Labrador Retriever, or just Labrador, is a type of retriever-gun dog. The Labrador is one of During the s, the 3rd Earl of Malmesbury, the 6th Duke of Buccleuch and the 12th Earl of Home collaborated . American Labs tend to be more energetic and, having been bred to compete in field trials, are better suited for.

    Darkangel83

    California Labradors, Retrievers & More Rescue, San Diego, California. Who is Labs and More? Murphy's Christmas Wish. #BITB 3.

    sun41

    And are there differences between chocolate Labs, yellow Labs, and black In general, the dogs who got more exercise were less fearful of.

    kamr666

    But this new-found rarity in turn made the darker red Labs more desirable. It's they .. lab, and Reid, a black American lab produced 8 black and 3 yellow pups.

    shifty47

    American Labs can weigh more. Both types of Labs have a water-resistant double coat that comes in three colors: black, yellow, and chocolate.

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